2.24.2011

Decorating for the Long Haul







all photographs by João Canziani via Dwell


As I’ve embarked on my little living room "revamp" project and Operation Simplicity, I’ve been thinking a lot about this idea of decorating for the long haul…this notion of design longevity.

When I flip through the pages (which I do almost every single day) of Handcrafted Modern, I’m struck by the utter timelessness of images. Most of the spaces that Leslie Williamson documents haven’t been “touched” in years, many, in fact, are exact replicas of how the owners/designers inhabited the space in the 60s, and yet, I’d happily move into any one of them today without changing a thing.

I had this same sense when Nelya sent me the images above of the home of California architect Ray Kappe… He and his wife have lived in this home (that he designed) for over 40 years, and it is still completely and totally relevant…beyond relevant even.

So while I’m busy switching up pillows, I’m careful not to let myself be seduced by what’s merely "of the moment" or (just as important) turned-off by something just because it feels a bit "overplayed" in the design blog-world (Jenny wrote a great post about that topic). I’m trying to follow my gut and my heart, to create a space that is a true (and somewhat timeless) reflection of our family.

Oh and I want cool pillows too. Just sayin.

10 comments:

kalanicut said...

Excellent thoughts. Esp. helpful to me as I rethink bedrooms this week. Such a great reminder that there is classic style that can last a lifetime. I was so happy that you linked to Jenny's post earlier this week. That was the first thing that came to mind as I read your words about designing for the long haul.

Designing for the long haul feels so much more peaceful than being blown by the winds of daily blogging whimsy. That whimsy can be exhausting.

Thank you for the inspiration!

Megan Taylor said...

It might help to take it one room at a time...thinking of each individual space as a home of its own. Are you going to document the re-vamp?

xoxo

Joslyn said...

megan -- i love this idea to think of each room as a little home of its own...good advice.

i'll definitely show some "afters" as soon as i have the living room fleshed out!

Style Dilettante said...

I agree completely Megan. Funny though, from the first photo I knew it had a feel of the pallet in the 70's. The pillows, & colors reminded me of David Hicks. Are you familiar? He is one of my all-time favorites!

Have a great weekend!

http://inherentstylela.blogspot.com/

girloliver said...

Love this post, especially the part about being over - saturated by items in the design world. Especially when, if you think about it, we all love to look at let's say Kate Spade's home and it isn't necessarily trendy, but on trend. And I think that's because they just decorated it however they wanted and didn't worry about ikat pillows being over!! The points you brought up and in the other post are good things to remember, I think.

Jackson said...

Well said...Yes after we re-modelled our house last year I had to stop myself constantly fiddling with things and wanting changes in the garden. Then I said: finished. And I don't go in design stores. I read magazines as an outsider, not looking to buy. Its actually very relaxing. So finished. Until next time. Hmmm...

About Last Weekend said...

Sorry, above comment from me, not my 11 year old son Jackson who didn't log out of my computer (sigh...)

Emom said...

I am a sucker for a good pillow too....smiles.

Kim in the Cove said...

This is what I have been trying to figure out for years... How can our home be timeless when design always seems to have a decade-specific look? But maybe that's only true when it's done wrong? Or maybe I just need to pick the decade I like best??? Stumped.

For now, I change lamps and throw pillows so often it's shameful. What's a girl to do??? :)

katemakes said...

Ray Kappe's home is stunning! Went through it as part of the Dwell homes tour a couple of years ago. It was the only house that we didn't have to wear booties in and they even allowed some people to use the bathroom! It is such an amazing house and really reflects the interests of the homeowners as well as making the most of the site. That being said, there isn't a handrailing to be found and lots of level changes. It's a wonder that nobody hurt themselves after a cocktail or two!